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This week, UUSC’s Director of Programs, Research and Partner Support, Danielle Fuller-Wimbush is in Zagreb, Croatia to hold a three-day convening of our partners and other non-governmental organizations advancing refugee and migrant rights in the region. It’s an opportunity for 15 organizations serving refugees along the migrant route that cuts through Macedonia, Serbia, Croatia, and Hungary to share strategies and better coordinate their critical work across multiple borders.

The Balkan Route, pre-March 2016. Source: Eurostat, Frontex

Since the spring of 2015, thousands of families have risked their lives to seek refuge in European Union (EU) countries, with most traveling through the Balkans. Many are fleeing the devastation caused by the Syrian civil war, which continues today.

In 2016, less than a year after the initial wave, countries began to close their borders and institute anti-immigrant tactics, stopping thousands of asylum-seekers from continuing their journey to safety and security. Hungary responded by building a razor-wire barrier on its border with Serbia and later with Croatia. Austria erected a four-kilometer-long fence at the Slovenia border, deployed armed forces around the border, and dramatically limited asylum applications. Macedonia, Croatia, and Slovenia announced that they were no longer letting migrants and refugees through their borders with Greece. For refugees, this has meant that their movement is largely curtailed and their access to asylum services is limited.

UUSC’s response to the Syrian refugee crisis has focused on supporting critical areas along the Syrian refugee migration route, where there is a lack of international protection, cooperation, burden sharing, and respect for the human rights of displaced peoples. Partners like the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, Centre for Peace Studies, and Are You Syrious, provide essential support to ensure that these families are resettled into their new home countries, that their rights are protected, and that they have sufficient access to basic services.

UUSC supported the Asylum Protection Center in buying this camper, which carries an interdisciplinary team throughout Serbia to assist refugees. The team includes a lawyer, psychosocial worker, and a translator.

Over the next few days our partners will discuss the current landscape of this crisis and how they can support one another to better serve refugees.

As conflicts throughout the world continue to fuel the largest refugee crisis since World War II, the need for convenings like these—which allow organizations on the ground to reflect, share stories, successes, and build relationships with one another—are critical. UUSC continues to find ways to respond to and address this and other humanitarian crises with compassion and genuine partnership. Stay tuned for more news from Zagreb as the convening continues!