Challenging Injustice, Advancing Human Rights

UUSC Statement on The 20-Year Mark Since the September 2001 Terrorist Attack

For Immediate Release: September 10, 2021

Media Contact:
Michael Givens
Director of Strategic Communications
Unitarian Universalist Service Committee
Phone: +1-857-540-0617
Email: mgivens@uusc.org

In remembrance of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the current evacuation of U.S. troops from Afghanistan, UUSC President and CEO Mary Katherine Morn released the following statement:

“Most of us who are old enough can remember exactly where we were on September 11, 2001 and the horrific events of that day live quite vividly in our memories. On that day, nearly 3,000 lives were taken and our nation was forever changed.

“In the last 20 years, we have waged a deadly so-called War on Terror that has caused the deaths of nearly one million people and has cost the United States trillions of dollars. As we solemnly reflect on these last 20 years, we reconcile with the most recent development that the United States is ending its presence in Afghanistan and leaving the country and its people in precarious political and social circumstances. This fact boldly sits on top of the unwarranted hatred, prejudice, and violence this nation has heaped on Muslim people in the form law enforcement policies and practices that criminalize and harass members of this community. Because of this, our refugee and immigrant systems have been weaponized against the Muslim community and other communities of color under the false pretense of ‘national security.’

“In addition to these international policy implications, we must also shoulder the burden of a pandemic that has taken the lives of more than 650,000 people in the United States and has—in many public dialogues—been politicized and weaponized to the detriment of social, political, and cultural cohesion.

“The weight of these three intersecting events—the most deadly terrorist attack in U.S. history; a costly and protracted engagement abroad; and a deadly pandemic—calls us into deep reflection.

“As we move forward, we must commit to radical acts of love and acceptance that acknowledge and transcend race, nationality, gender, wealth, age, and ethnicity. UUSC will continue to live into its legacy of love and acceptance through our work to uplift those facing oppression, follow their leadership, and push forward a global agenda rooted in justice, equity, and respect for all.”

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The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee (UUSC) is a human rights and solidarity organization founded as a rescue mission in 1940 during the Holocaust. Based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and with a membership of more than 35,000 supporters across the United States, UUSC’s programs focus on the issues of climate change, migrant justice, and crisis response.