Strength for the Fight Ahead

January 20 marks the one-year anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration. For human rights advocates, the past 365 days have been marked by daily efforts to resist actions from our nation’s highest office that propagate racism, hate, fear, ignorance, and greed. Right now, we are fighting for a clean Dream Act even as dysfunction in Washington holds up these efforts.

However, reflecting on the past year, and the work of our partners and staff in action, gives us hope—this work tells a story that is much more about courage and perseverance than one of despair.

Our shared vision of a world free from oppression provides fuel in the fight to advance human rights. Working together, with our partners and allies, we have activated strategies that confront unjust power structures and challenge oppressive policies.

Here are just a few moments from the past year that motivate us for the work that lies ahead.

This year, sustained by the passion of our community and supporters, we will continue to focus on strategies for protecting families fleeing violence in Central America, fighting for an end to ethnic cleansing in Burma, and responding to the front lines of climate change and ready to respond to natural disasters.

UUSC Applauds Ambassador Haley’s Call for Truth in Burma

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley did the right thing yesterday by publicly calling on the government of Burma (Myanmar) to allow access to the U.N. Human Rights Council (UNHRC) fact-finding mission. We applaud Ambassador Haley’s statement and urge her to continue to use the United States’ position as a member of the UNHRC to call for the truth.

Since violent clashes in 2012, the Burmese government has confined more than 120,000 Rohingya, an ethnic Muslim minority, to more than 40 internally displaced persons camps where they are forced to rely on international food and medical aid to survive. The situation escalated late last year when the Burmese military launched a counterinsurgency campaign resulting in indiscriminate killings, mass rape, and destroyed at least 1,500 Rohingya homes, mosques, and other Muslim-owned structures. Aid workers, journalists, and independent human rights monitors have been barred from the area.

In March the UNHRC passed a resolution to “establish facts and circumstances of the alleged recent human rights violations by military and security forces, and abuses, in Myanmar, in particular in Rakhine State.”

Now the government of Burma, under the leadership of Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, is denying access to the mission in an effort to shield the military from accountability. It is bitterly ironic that the very leader who won a Nobel Peace Prize for her human rights advocacy, which included calling for international investigations in Burma, is now blocking access to truth and transparency in the country.

The response of Suu Kyi and her government begs the question – “What is the government and military of Burma trying to hide?” It makes this mission even more important. Ambassador Haley must continue her strong, public stand for the truth to be revealed in Burma and for the victims of relentless human rights violations at the hands of the military.

We applaud Ambassador Haley for supporting those under relentless siege in Burma. This type of diplomacy, along with U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce and the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission’s ongoing support for human rights in Burma is the type of leadership needed in this moment.

We Can Do So Much Together

As the end of the fiscal year swiftly approaches, we are working to reach our goal for the 2017 Annual Fund. UUSC has set an ambitious goal of $300,000 and we need your help! Donations of any amount are greatly appreciated by the UUSC team, our partners, and those whose rights are threated around the world. We need to meet our $300,000 target by June 30, 2017, so please considering making your gift today!

Your Annual Fund gift will help projects like the ones listed below and more. Please consider making a donation to support our work today.

Provide Legal Assistance to Immigrants and Asylum-Seekers on the U.S. Border

UUSC is continuing our work with RAICES (Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services) to provide legal assistance to vulnerable women and children fleeing dangerous conditions in the Northern Triangle. Due to the current political climate, immigrant rights and safety are at risk, so UUSC’s partnership with RAICES is even more important. With your continued support, RAICES is able to provide Central American refugees with much needed resources.

Work to End Human Rights Abuses in Burma

UUSC is partnering with grassroots organizations in Burma (Myanmar) to raise awareness and take action against the on-going (and startlingly under-reported) violence against the Rohingya minority. The Rohingya, a religious and ethnic minority in Burma’s Rakhine State, are being denied basic human rights and have had their sense of security stripped away.

Earlier this year, thousands of UUSC supporters joined us in calling on Secretary Tillerson to support a Commission of Inquiry to investigate these abuses. That investigation is now underway, but due in part to a lack of global outrage and governmental accountability, the Burmese government has been able to continue carrying out horrific human rights violations. UUSC is committed to working with our partners on the ground to document violence and advocate for change in the region.

Support LGBTQI Rights

In many countries in southern Africa, homophobia remains embedded in political, religious, and social spheres–often with violent consequences. Countless LGBTQI individuals are denied safety, freedom, and dignity simply because of who they are. UUSC is working with our local partners on grassroots advocacy and faith-based tolerance trainings, which will be integral in dismantling institutionalized prejudice in countries like Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and South Africa.

If you are able, please consider making a gift in support of this important work. Whatever you can contribute will be greatly appreciated. Nothing we accomplish would be possible without you—our committed supporters—and for that, you have our deepest thanks.

Rights Reading

Our weekly roundup of what we’re reading includes a few select articles from the front lines of human rights that we don’t want you to miss. This week’s catch up on the recent rulings on Trump’s travel bans, human rights violations in Burma (Myanmar), and immigration in the United States.

Two Federal Judges Rule Against Trump’s Latest Travel Ban, Alexander Burns, The New York Times, March 15, 2017

 “This is a great day for democracy, religious and human rights. I am very pleased that the processing of my mother-in-law’s paperwork will not stop now but more importantly that this Muslim ban will not separate families and loved ones just because they happen to be from the six countries.” -Mr. Elshikh

Two federal judges, from Hawaii and Maryland, blocked the Trump Administration’s revised travel ban earlier this week. This is the second setback since Trump issued the new executive order banning travel from certain Muslim-majority countries. The first block was from a federal court in Seattle. The federal judges both argued that the travel ban was discriminatory and based on religion, making it unconstitutional. In addition, the lawsuits mention that the executive order harms the operations of various organizations, schools, and hospitals overseas.

Learn more about the effects these executive orders are having on immigrant families in our blog, DHS Memos Threaten Immigrants’ Rights, Families, and Safety.

Myanmar must ‘allow Rohingya to leave camps’, Al Jazeera, March 16, 2017

Former U.N. Secretary, General Kofi Annan, was appointed to lead a commission by Burma’s (Myanmar) current de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi to investigate tensions between Buddhists and Muslims in the country. The commission released a report stating that Burma must close internally displaced persons (IDP) camps that have been housing and trapping thousands of Rohingya, Burma’s Muslim minority, for the past five years. The Rohingya are not recognized citizens and are denied basic rights, including healthcare, education, and often, humanitarian aid. The report also recommends that the U.N. to run an independent investigation into the ongoing violence and persecution of that has been taking place over decades.

Today, UUSC President and CEO Tom Andrews, along with other human rights leaders, gave testimony on the humanitarian situation in Burma. Click here to watch the hearing and join our call for a Commission of Inquiry at uusc.org/truthforrohingya.

Donald Trump’s Crackdown On Undocumented Immigrants Is Silencing Exploited Workers, Dave Jamieson, Huffington Post, March 8, 2017

The Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants may have opposite consequences than intended. Christopher Williams, a lawyer who works closely with undocumented immigrants states, “I honestly think it’s creating an incentive to hire more undocumented workers, because now they’re even more vulnerable to being exploited.”

In light of the recent raids, some workers are even denying back pay, afraid of providing their home addresses for fear of deportation. The increase in raids and deportations are creating unsafe working environments to an already vulnerable population.

 

Crimes Against Humanity Escalate in Burma

[March 9, 2017: This post was updated to reflect accurate numbers of people killed, from 86 to 1,000].

Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic and religious minority population in Burma (Myanmar), are one of the most persecuted groups in the world and are currently facing extreme violence at the hands of the Burmese military.

In northern Rakhine State, on October 9, 2016, militants attacked three police outposts, armed with mostly sticks and knives, killing nine police. This triggered retaliatory attacks by the Burmese military that have included killing of civilians, including children and babies, mass rape, and a scorched-earth practice that has destroyed over 1,400 homes, mosques, and other Rohingya-owned structures. The military has claimed that this is simply a “clearance operation” against terrorists, but it has indiscriminately and disproportionately harmed large numbers of civilians. The horror is compounded by the fact that the military has barred journalists and independent human rights monitors from the area and have restricted humanitarian aid – including food and healthcare – to people living in the IDP camps.

Map of Burma (Myanmar), Rakhine State highlighted in red.Rohingya activists and the international community have argued that these most recent atrocities are part of a long-standing campaign against the Rohingya that has been called “crimes against humanity,” “ethnic cleansing,” and even “genocide.” Indeed, the International State Crime Initiative has documented the process of genocide unfolding in Rakhine State.

Since October, attacks have included state-sanctioned violence such as:

There are also reports of security forces restricting humanitarian aid, including from the World Food Program, from Rohingya IDP camps where there are no other sources of food. An estimated 3,000 children in these areas already suffer from severe acute malnutrition and will likely die without this support.

In light of this violence, 66,000 people have fled across the border to Bangladesh, where they continue to face inhumane treatment. There have been reports of refugees shot, beaten, and robbed while trying to cross the border. Those who make it often find themselves in the cramped makeshift homes of earlier refugees or struggle to survive on the roads and in the woods with no shelter.

UUSC is working directly with our grassroots partners on the ground in Burma, as well as Rohingya leaders and other allied groups who are documenting the atrocities, calling for an independent investigation into the human rights abuses and providing food and aid to those in desperate need. In early February, UUSC staff joined a broad coalition of human rights organizations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to discuss a joint international strategy to respond to the situation. We are now jointly calling for the U.N. Human Rights Council to pass a resolution to mandate a Commission of Inquiry comprising international experts to examine all human rights violations, establish facts, and assess alleged crimes under international law in Rakhine State against Rohingya Muslims and other Muslims as well as Rakhine Buddhists.